Frequently Asked Questions

At Above & Beyond Flooring we want you to feel comfortable enough to ask us as many questions as it takes to get understandable answers. To help answer some of our customers more frequently asked questions we sought out expert advice from one of our handiest little helpers.

If you have a question and do not see an answer posted here email Mark Emsbach and we will get back to you with the answer.

  • How often should I clean my hardwood floor?
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  • Should I mop my hardwood floor?
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  • What cleaning products should I use on my hardwood floor?
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  • What are the advantages of pre-finished flooring?
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  • Can I install a solid 3/4" hardwood floor in my basement?
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  • Which type of wood is the hardest?
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  • Why are there variances in color, even within the same species of wood?
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  • Why are there gaps in between the boards on my floor?
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  • How can I have more hardwood flooring questions answered?
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    How often should I clean my hardwood floor?

    Because dirt and grit can scratch your floor, it is a good idea to implement a regular cleaning routine that involves sweeping or vacuuming often, as well as the use of throw rugs and felt or plastic floor protectors on furniture. Less dirt and grit gets tracked inside the house if outside mats and area rugs are placed inside entryways. However, because mats and areas rugs tend to attract the dirt and grit you are trying to keep off your floor, it is just as important to clean underneath the rugs inside your home. Also, be aware that some rubber-backed rugs, foam-backed rugs, & non-slip pads contain additives that may discolor the wood. Of course, liquid spills should be cleaned up as soon as possible.

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    Should I mop my hardwood floor?

    Above & Beyond Flooring does not recommend that you use water to clean your floors. Wetness and wood floors are a bad mix. It is best to simply dust mop, sweep, or vacuum. However, if old habits die hard, then damp mopping using a neutral pH wood cleaner, or visit our recommended products page. Even when cleaning with acceptable products, do not "over wet" your floor. Allowing water to stand on your floor can dull your finish, discolor the wood, and will very likely cause cupping, swelling, and, eventually, gapping. Remember, you are cleaning the finish, not the wood, so do not use water if the finish is in poor shape.

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    What cleaning products should I use on my hardwood floor?

    At Above & Beyond Flooring we sell cleaning kits, from Basic Coatings that are appropriate for your floor. Products NOT recommended are ammonia, pine soap, oil soap, chlorine bleach or any abrasive cleaner. All of which can damage the finish. Wax, or polish, although not severely damaging to pre-finished floors, is also NOT recommended because it can often make them slippery, dull, and more importantly, create problems when the floor requires refinishing. If you do wax your floor and it ever needs renewing, you will have to sand the entire floor down to the bare wood before re-coating.

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    What are the advantages of pre-finished flooring?

    Pre-finished flooring installs exactly the same as unfinished flooring, however, once the pre-finished floor is installed you're all done. The only thing left to do is move the furniture back into the room and enjoy. Pre-finished floors also have an incredible finish warranty usually consisting of 10-25 years depending on the brand of flooring.

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    Can I install a solid 3/4" hardwood floor in my basement?

    Solid 3/4" Hardwood flooring cannot be installed below grade (below the soil line) or over concrete. When a solid product encounters moisture it reacts very negatively. Therefore, a laminate or engineered flooring must be used. Laminate flooring is constructed by fusing 4-plys of material together to form a product with unprecedented strength and durability. An engineered product is very similar with the exception that they usually have a real wood layer on top of the constructed core. Call us at (720) 934.4432 to discuss some of these options available to you.

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    Which type of wood is the hardest?

    All hardwoods that are used for flooring are very dependable and resilient. A common measurer for different scales of hardness is the Janka test. It is the industry standard for judging the ability of various hardwood flooring species to withstand denting and wear. Red Oak hardwood flooring, which has a Janka Hardness rating of 1290, is the flooring industry benchmark for comparing hardness of different wood species. Some of the other more popular species of wood that are used for flooring are Brazilian Cherry (#2345), Hard Maple (#1450), White Ash (#1320), and Yellow Birch (#1260).

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    Why are there variances in color, even within the same species of wood?

    Wood floors age and change color – it’s natural. Even wood from the same tree can show signs of variance. For instance, "younger wood" closer to the outside of the tree will be lighter than the wood from the center portion. Your purchase should look similar to the wood samples that we've displayed on this site, however there are certain instances when your floor might look slightly different. As a tree grows and matures, over approximately 60 years, it absorbs minerals and other essential elements, which can change the color and appearance of the wood.

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    Why are there gaps in between the boards on my floor?

    Humidity is usually the #1 cause. During the summer months of the year your hardwood floor soaks up this humidity and expands. As the winter months roll around, and the heat is turned on, the floor dries out and starts to gap. There are a couple of tips we recommend to try and avoid this problem. Keep your home's relative humidity ideally between 45% and 55% – this helps prevent excess shrinkage, cracking, swelling or cupping. Running a humidifier or dehumidifier should help. Also, prior to installation, Above & Beyond Flooring, LLC usually suggests that you let your floor acclimate to its surroundings. Two weeks before the floor is to be laid, bring the flooring into the area where the floor is to be installed. Stack the flooring bundles leaving space between the stacks. This will allow air to circulate between the stacks and for your flooring to properly acclimate.

    Excessive moisture is the most common cause of buckling floors. Moisture can come from leaking pipes, wet basements or crawl spaces, plywood exposed to the elements during construction, and houses left vacant without proper ventilation. It's imperative that you identify the source of the problem, and eliminate it. Floors can also buckle if a proper expansion gap around each wall is not used.

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    How can I have more hardwood flooring questions answered?

    If your hardwood flooring questions are not answered on this page, or you simply wish to speak with a representative at Above & Beyond Flooring, LLC, please contact us at (720) 934-4432 or by email at mjemsbach@msn.com.

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